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PostPosted: Thu Aug 15, 2013 8:40 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jul 06, 2011 3:06 am
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I came across a video describing a simplified Buddhist philosophy of addiction & recovery/healing that I found helpful for myself, & thought others might benefit from it.

Here: http://youtu.be/OESohZFCiz0 "Addiction (Buddhism) and Health"

Particularly it was helpful when it pinpointed that addiction to anything is actually addiction to impermanence & false refuge -- whereas we have access to true refuge through meditation & knowing ourselves through the path (something like that).

And I would like to open this thread to anyone who wants to share resources (or thoughts/related things) on any spiritual or philosophical approach to understanding & healing with addiction, recovery, & health.

I was also curious if anyone knew of any books or reading material having to do with Buddhism & addiction/recovery/health that could be a supplement to some people in recovery from any addiction. ??


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 21, 2013 7:25 pm 
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Partner's Coach (Admin)

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Hello laughingchild,

I have not read any books in that address addiction through a buddhist tradition specifically, however any good book teaches the buddhist way can be easily transferred to recovery and healing. The same can be said about the principles of any faith. The trouble is that many people don't really put their faith to practice, or rather, they don't integrate it and instead go through the motions (i.e. by practicing the rituals of the religion, thereby missing the truth of any message). Of course, this is my opinion and not a reflection of RN nor any other coach. :w: That said, sometimes going through the motions can be the catalyst for real transformation. But, not always. Intrinsic desire and motivation are the critical ingredients. Also, any person who wishes to incorporate faith and spirituality into their recovery or healing process can easily do so via the vision and values exercises.

Anyhow, I read "Buddhism for the western world" by Lama Surya Das and found it quite engaging. Also, "The Road Less Travelled" by M. Scott Peck has some great wisdom within, from a Christian-based perspective. Eckhart Tolle's "A new Earth" and "The power of now" are popular favourites, and I got a lot out of them as well.



Be well.

_________________
Between stimulus and response there is a space. In that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom. (Viktor E. Frankl)


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 22, 2013 3:08 am 
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Joined: Fri Nov 25, 2011 2:49 pm
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Hi laughingchild,

Now this is my kind of post! :s:

While I am a Zen Buddhist practitioner and have gotten quite into the practice as part of my recovery (and now, life), I haven't actually read many books about Buddhist approaches to addiction...the only thing I can think of off the top of my head is an e-book put out by Tricycle magazine (the Buddhist quarterly) that was about addiction (I think you have to either subscribe or pay a small fee). Here is the link. Note, I think they focus primarily on a 12-Step approach; but I think you are far enough in your understanding now to be able to take what fits and leave the rest. :w:

http://www.tricycle.com/wisdom-collecti ... -addiction

For me, it more worked like, I learned about addiction from the recovery workshop, learned about Buddhism from reading books about it...then started to naturally see how Buddhist concepts could aid addiction recovery (as Mel said). Now, I don't see a separation between my practice, my recovery, my addiction (or rather, my reliance on certain behavioural patterns to achieve temporary gratification, as I see it now), my thoughts, my emotions, my actions, and my life...it is all part of the same flow. I actually think that a lot of parts of the workshop already have Buddhist concepts in them, even if I'm not sure Jon intended that...for instance, the lesson on Recovery Triggers near the end of the workshop was one of the readings that actually turned me on to Buddhism in the first place, because it so drastically altered how I understand my relationship with the world and the importance of perception on how you experience the world. The point is, I think you can read about Buddhism in books that don't necessarily talk directly about addiction, and still apply those concepts to your recovery and life. Because really, once you "get it", once you understand what addiction truly is...there is no more "addiction". There are just healthy and unhealthy choices, emotions, patterns, perception, and thoughts...all things that Buddhism talks about deeply.

Quote:
Particularly it was helpful when it pinpointed that addiction to anything is actually addiction to impermanence & false refuge -- whereas we have access to true refuge through meditation & knowing ourselves through the path (something like that).


Yes, the philosophy of impermanence has many uses in addiction recovery...chief among them that both thoughts and emotions (and therefore, urges) are impermanent...as well as the fact that we are looking outside ourselves for gratification, as well as (like you mentioned) attaching to impermanent things like they were permanent (even if these things are not physical, like fantasies), and that by focusing on hunting for something outside ourselves for gratification, we only achieve temporary, fleeting gratification, which ultimately leaves us constantly wanting and dissatisfied. At least in Zen, an important part of the practice is realizing that there is nothing to be gained or lost...that you do not need something outside yourself in order to be content (and this is meant in a craving type of way...obviously, everyone still needs to eat, drink, etc.).

Anyways, I could literally keep writing about this, so I should stop myself...needless to say, this is an area I'm very much interested in and would be happy to discuss more. :g: And hopefully one day, we will have a Buddhist version of the RN workshop here (as one of CoachJon's goals that is still being worked towards is to have different versions of the site tailored to people from different faith traditions, so people can recover within the context of their faith, and with others in the same tradition as support).

:g:

Boundless

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"If you cannot find the truth right where you are, where do you expect to find it?" - Dogen

"Be a lamp unto yourself." - Buddha

"The obstacle is the path."


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 22, 2013 7:20 am 
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Partner's Coach (Admin)

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Because really, once you "get it", once you understand what addiction truly is...there is no more "addiction". There are just healthy and unhealthy choices, emotions, patterns, perception, and thoughts...

And behaviours. But yes, this is essence of it, very well summarized. But, as succinctly as CoachB has put it, make no mistake--there is nothing simple about recovery (or healing) itself. These are complex processes, but the underlying principle is simple (once you get it, as CoachB pointed out). The work is putting it into practice, refining and integrating. (I think I am going off on a tangent, so I'll leave it at that :w: )

Be well.

_________________
Between stimulus and response there is a space. In that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom. (Viktor E. Frankl)


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 27, 2015 6:51 pm 
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Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2014 12:20 am
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:pe: :pe: :pe: :pe: :pe: I just discovered this wonderful thread and wonder if one of you wonderfull coaches know how to bump it over to the recovery and partner forums??? It is a great help to those of us who question traditional religious approaches!!!! (Plus, a lot of us are so mired down in our own healing, we forget to explore the whole of the website that is REcovery Nation (and also a wonderful DIScovery for me!!!LOL!!).......Thanks so much for the thread and the insight!!!!

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It is always OK in the end...if it's not OK, it's not the end!


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 27, 2015 7:16 pm 
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Kajer and Everyone else
I loved Coach Mel's statement "Because really, once you "get it", once you understand what addiction truly is...there is no more "addiction". There are just healthy and unhealthy choices, emotions, patterns, perception, and thoughts..." So much said in so few words. Thank you all


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 10, 2015 11:43 am 
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Partner's Coach (Admin)

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Thank you Kajer for the suggestion of moving this to each of the support forums. I have now done so--one copy here and one in the recovery support forum.

Be well.

_________________
Between stimulus and response there is a space. In that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom. (Viktor E. Frankl)


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