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PostPosted: Sun Nov 20, 2011 9:02 am 
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Joined: Tue Jan 19, 2010 8:54 am
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Hi Lift

Quote:
When using daily monitoring, is it realistic to expect whatever actions you place on the list to be ingrained? Or is it more realistic to expect to remain focus on those activities or goals that you place on your list?


I think it should be both. Monitoring is both a system of review (of values that are engrained) and a tool that actively helps you engrain them.

So each day, you can assign a particular value you can work on in your life. EG: Today, I am going to actively seek opportunities to communicate honestly. The following day you can review how you did, and whether you need to do more work. The Monitoring both motivates engraining and assesses how you are doing. When you feel confident with one value or action plan, move onto another. Monitoring should be flexible and constantly updated.

Monitoring is also something you can do during the day. Come up with a couple of questions and once an hour, ask them - eg, How am I doing? Am I practicing my action plans? Have I worked on my assigned value.

Hope this helps.

Shaw


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 20, 2011 6:29 pm 
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Joined: Fri Sep 26, 2008 11:22 pm
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Ok. Good.

That's what I wanted to know. I had an item on my to do list that said something like: "Today, I'm going to seek out opportunities to record estimates on appropriate alloted time for specific activities". Which now i look at it, it looks and sounds a little vague on "specific activities" and "estimates". It also doesn't seem like something I plan to ingrain because I only want to do some estimate measures of time for my value of Time Management that way during the week, I'll already have close estimates for freetime, school time, eating time, etc... That way, I'll be able to place activities in appropriate time slots on my weekly schedule. I'll be able to measure my own time effectively.

So maybe I probably didn't place the right item on my daily monitoring. :s:

I also may have overjudged on my daily monitoring. Though I don't know if I did, but I had this impression that once you have something on daily monitoring, you review it at the end of the day. But hearing what your saying in terms of reviewing it within an hour of my time or even reviewing it the next day suggests that maybe I wasn't flexible in managing my daily monitoring. Maybe, I gotta loosen up and relax when approaching it.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 21, 2011 9:24 pm 
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Joined: Fri Sep 26, 2008 11:22 pm
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Oh and is it a good idea to restart the daily monitoring from the first Health Monitoring lesson? I just got out of my self-deluded acting out phase on Saturday, kicked myself in the arse, and dedicated myself to starting back to the beginning of the Recovery Workshop. Nobody told me to do this. I am thinking about redoing the first Health Monitoring when I get to Health Monitoring 1 in spite of at least getting it down with the "Today, I am going to seek out opportunities to..." level of daily monitoring.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 22, 2011 2:08 am 
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Hi Lift

Sorry, what do you mean by

Quote:
restart the daily monitoring from the first Health Monitoring lesson?


Early in the morning here and clearly my brain isnt working?! Do you mean use that template? Or wait until you reach that lesson?

In a way, monitoring is a good example of recovery as a whole. It isnt something we do separate to our lives. Self-monitoring should be on-going - each day, perhaps once an hour. Nothing major - just checking in with yourself for say 60 seconds every 60 minutes. Asking how you are doing, what you are feeling? Do you need a break? What challenges are coming up in the next hour?

Think of it in terms of exercise. Like going for a run and wearing a heart monitor to judge the stress your heart is under. Do you need to up the pace or slow things down.

Good idea to go through the lessons again. But make sure this isnt a substitute for recovery in your a life but a motivation to engrain the lessons. I began to redo the lessons, and am still reading through them. But I found that some simply didnt apply to me - and I was going through the motions. Worse than this, I was procrastinating about facing some practical issues in my recovery.

However, I think it is highly beneficial. Many lessons will make more sense to you now. Find which ones those are and really concentrate on them!!

Let me know about my initial question.

Shaw


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 22, 2011 8:41 pm 
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This is what I meant: The template in which the first Health Monitoring lesson uses. Which is the list of items relevant to the areas in our lives (values) that we're building up. I'm sure you now know what I'm talking about after doing lesson 1. The later health monitoring lessons change it from a list of 10 items or so to more of a "today, I am going to seek opportunities to..." kind of monitoring. So i meant turning my health monitoring back to the 10 item list it was at the beginning when we did Health Monitoring Lesson 1.

Now, after taking a quick glance at what you were saying right here:

Quote:
Self-monitoring should be on-going - each day, perhaps once an hour. Nothing major - just checking in with yourself for say 60 seconds every 60 minutes. Asking how you are doing, what you are feeling? Do you need a break? What challenges are coming up in the next hour?


I pondered in my head just now about those times recently and weeks ago when I started questioning several things: Where am I at in recovery? Where am I at in the eight stages to permanent recovery? Have I mastered the first stage unto the rest? And so forth.

I thought it may mean something having to put these questions in my head weeks ago and just now. Not that I asked these questions I just mentioned weeks ago. These were ones I questioned immediately and pondered after reading the Workshop Orientation. I thought it would be a good idea to investigate where I'm at in this whole process. Since saturday, I could easily say I wasn't even close to the transition from addiction to recovery. Nor even recovery to health. I'm thinking right now if the questions I had put into my head are signs of health monitoring evolving into a fluid, natural process. I've done this a couple of times during my weekly escapades and the days when I wasn't acting out, but I didn't recognize them as health monitoring, so I thought I put this on here just to make sure if this is an example of what you're talking about in regards to self-monitoring and health monitoring.


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 23, 2011 7:35 am 
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Hi Lift

Interesting question. In a way, I'm not sure how we judge how we are doing in recovery. Can this be measured? I am 20% recovered right now?! In one sense, recovery (in very different forms) is something we do for the rest of our lives. To put this a different way, healthy living seems to me to be a continual and instinctive application of the lessons we learn here.

At the same time, I think it is a function of Health Monitoring to assess how far we have come and what we have still to do.

Perhaps we can distinguish between a daily and weekly monitoring. For me, my daily monitoring occurs out and about in my life. I have 3 or 4 questions - mainly related to the internet, but often quite general. I ask them every hour or so.

How are you doing?

Are you in any danger?

What is coming up that might need attention?

Are you taking breaks at your computer?

These are general, quick - aids to awareness really. but they can spur action. Actually, I just realised - I often realise that if I havent asked them for a while, there might be a good reason to ask them at once!!!! Either that or I am utterly absorbed in work - but that is rare?!!!

Your weekly monitoring should be more detailed - but perhaps cover the sorts of issue you raise.

Don't get too obsessed with how you are doing./ there are objective measures for recovery - but mostly, you set the goals you need, an only you can judge how you are doing. In other words, it isnt a race with a finishing line. It is more like videogame - where we pick up experience, learn how to use certain tools, occasinoally get blasted (by ourselves) and then start all over again.

the final thought. Monitoring should be changeing all the time. Some questions will always apply to you - but others will come and go as you face new challenges, or overcome others.

In fact, you have inspired me to look at my own monitoring.

Shaw


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